International Journal of Social Forestry



Abstracts

International Journal of Social Forestry (IJSF), 2010, 3(1):1-16

ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF DEMOCRATIC RULE ON SOME ASPECTS OF FOREST RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN ONDO STATE, NIGERIA


Adesoji Gideon Adedayo and Matthew Banji Oyun

Abstract

The study investigated the impact of democratic rule on forest resources management in Ondo State, Nigeria. Two ecological zones (i.e. lowland rain forest and derived savanna) were purposively selected in the study area. Twenty respondents were randomly selected from forestry staff in the State Forestry Department in each zone to make a total of 40 respondents. Data were obtained from these respondents through well structured and pre-tested questionnaire. The results showed that Tectona grandis, Gmelina arborea, Nauclea diderichii, Mansonia ultisima and Terminalia superba are the major tree species planted in the study area between 1991 and 2007. The results showed that democratic rule has a significant influence on forest plantation development and training of forestry staff in the study area. The study identified poor funding, insecurity and low manpower as the major problems of forest management in the study area during democratic rule. The study identified 4 ways by which forestry sub-sector can benefit more from democratic rule in the study area. These include making more realistic budget and prompt release of funds to the forestry sub-sector, encouraging foresters in the state forestry department to go for more training, enacting legislation that will ensure forest industries in the state invest in forest plantation development and giving of tax relief to individuals that plant a stipulated number of trees.

Keywords:
democratic rule, forest resources management, forest plantation development, Nigeria.  
 

International Journal of Social Forestry (IJSF), 2010, 3(1):17-27


USING GINI COEFFICIENT FOR ANALYSING DISTRIBUTION OF COMMUNITY FORESTS IN NEPAL BY DEVELOPMENT AND ECOLOGICAL REGIONS


Anuja Raj Sharma

Abstract

This paper assesses the distribution of community forests in Nepal by development and ecological regions and makes a comparison of the situation across two years in Nepal. Community forests in Nepal are handed over without any threshold for per household forest area and an implication of such practice is increased inequality in the distribution of community forests. Using Gini coefficient as a measure of inequality, this paper concludes the Gini coefficient of community forestry distribution has slightly improved in the year 2009 as compared with that of the year 2007. It means that the distribution of community forests in Nepal is being directed towards equality. The provision of Initial Environmental Examination (IEE)/Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in community forests has acted positively for reducing inequality in the distribution of community forests. For moderating the coefficient, the paper dwells on the provision of limitations on handover of forest area based on per household forest area.

Keywords:
Gini coefficient, inequality, community forests, household.  
 

International Journal of Social Forestry (IJSF), 2010, 3(1):28-48


EATING FROM THE WILD: INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE ON WILD EDIBLE PLANTS IN PARROHA VDC OF RUPANDEHI DISTRICT, CENTRAL NEPAL


Kamal Prasad Acharya and Rajendra Acharya

Abstract

People in different parts of Nepal depend on plants and plant parts to fulfill their daily needs and have developed unique knowledge of their utilization. The communities have a rich knowledge of wild edible plants (WEPs). However, there have been very few studies on the documentation of WEPs which play an important role in survival of many ethnic groups in Nepal. This study aims to document information about WEPs of Parroha VDC in the Rupandehi district of Nepal. Information on the use of WEPs was collected in March-April 2007 and June-July 2008 by focus group discussions. Altogether 67 plant species belonging to 41 families and 57 genera were recorded as being used as a source of fruit, vegetables, pickle (achaar) or nectar of which, 51 species have single use, whereas 16 species have two or more uses. The majority of the species and trees (43%) and mushrooms represent the least (4%). The majority of plants and plant parts are used when fresh. Mainly low socio-economic status (SES) people are involved in collecting these resources and this traditional knowledge is declining as the younger generation shows less interest in using WEPs. The WEPs were used as supplements to food but information on the nutritional values and possible toxic effects are not known. Therefore, research in this field is necessary as this finding may help to counter the needs of people during a scarcity of food stuffs.

Keywords:
sustainable utilization, wild edible plants, Parroha VDC, Nepal.  
 

International Journal of Social Forestry (IJSF), 2010, 3(1):49-65


ASSESSMENT OF SOME OTHER TRADITIONAL USES OF ACCEPTED AGROFORESTRY FUELWOOD SPECIES IN AKINYELE AND IDO LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREAS, OYO STATE, NIGERIA


A.A. Erakhrumen, O.Y. Ogunsanwo, and O.I. Ajewole

Abstract

This study was carried out in order to assess some other traditional uses that some woody species can be put to, apart from their usefulness as fuelwood, using Akinyele and Ido Local Government Areas (LGAs), Oyo State, Nigeria, as a case study. Woody species found in agroforestry plots/farms in the study area, were compiled from questionnaires retrieved from 179 respondents, then prioritised using the respondents’ ranking, from which twelve species that top the ranking were selected. Friedman chi-square result revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the ranking pattern of the respondents in the two LGAs (χ2=2.17; p<0.05). The questionnaire survey and literature search for other traditional uses to which the various parts of the accepted fuelwood species are put revealed that culinary and medicinal uses were dominant among these other uses. It was therefore recommended, based on this study, that management strategies that aim at balancing wood use as fuel and other traditional uses should be encouraged.

Keywords:
agroforestry, fuelwood, prioritisation, traditional uses, rural communities.  
 

International Journal of Social Forestry (IJSF), 2010, 3(1):66-80


CAN THE RAIN FORESTS OF NIGERIA SUSTAIN TRADE IN MEDICINAL PLANTS?


Gbadebo J. Osemeobo

Abstract

This study assessed stakeholder opinions on the capability of the rainforests to sustain commercial harvest of medicinal plants in Nigeria. Data were derived from a questionnaire survey of commercial collectors of medicinal plants in the rainforest of Nigeria. The study reveals that sustainability of the rainforest was hampered by complicated land tenure regimes under common resource management, intensive logging and poor harvesting practices. Problems of lack of management plans, little or no forest regeneration by planting, lack of forest inventory and monitoring activities and freerider issues under community regulations did not favour sustainability of the rainforest. However, stakeholders were willing to cooperate with a third party and apply scientific methods to manage the forests under strict regulations based on transparency, assigned responsibilities and equitable sharing of financial benefits derived from forest management. The conclusion is reached that the forests may continue to sustain trade in medicinal plants if in situ and ex situ conservation practices are combined within natural and man made habitants respectively.

Keywords:
stakeholders, medicinal plants, conservation, forest regeneration, management plans.  

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