International Journal of Social Forestry



Abstracts

International Journal of Social Forestry (IJSF), 2012, 5(1): 1-21

EXPLORING FAMILY FOREST LANDOWNER DIVERSITY: PLACE, RACE, AND GENDER IN ALABAMA, UNITED STATES

John Schelhas, Yaoqi Zhang, Robert Zabawa, and Bin Zheng

Abstract
Family forestry is characterized by heterogeneity in ownership structure, owners’ objectives, and management practices. Differences among forest landowners by age and occupation have been regularly documented, but other social dimensions, such as race and gender, have received considerably less attention. We conducted exploratory research on racial and gender differences among forest landowners in two Alabama counties via a mail survey in order to identify promising areas for future research and forestry outreach. We found that gender and race influence land holding practices, management objectives, access to information and technical support. African American and female forest landowners tend to be less involved in forest management but would like more information. Understanding how forest landowners from different social backgrounds use, value, and manage forest is crucial for developing appropriate programs to encourage landowners from all segments of society to manage their forests for private and public benefits, and further research is warranted.

Keywords: female forest landowners, non-industrial private forests, North America



International Journal of Social Forestry (IJSF), 2012, 5(1): 22-37

GENDER ROLE IN HOME GARDEN MANAGEMENT IN THE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY: A CASE STUDY IN BANDARBAN HILL DISTRICT, BANGLADESH

Sharmila Das and Md. Mohiuddin

Abstract
This study was conducted on the Murong community in Bandarban Hill District of Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh in order to ascertain the gender role and the level of indigenous knowledge in the management and utilization of plant resources of home gardens. The study revealed that women play a vital role in all activities of home garden management. There was a variation in the selection and preferences of plant resource component based on nature of utilization by gender. Women prefer plant resources to meet household requirements rather than cash crops which are absolutely considered as men’s domain. Besides, women’s indigenous knowledge was significantly higher than that of men with respect to multiple uses of non timber forest products. However, domestication of a huge number of wild species of different habits in their home garden is also mainly done by women.

Keywords: gender, home garden, indigenous knowledge, utilization, plant resource components, Bangladesh



International Journal of Social Forestry (IJSF), 2012, 5(1): 38-56

PEOPLE’S PARTICIPATION IN PARTICIPATORY FOREST MANAGEMENT IN THE SAL FORESTS OF BANGLADESH: AN EXPLORATIVE STUDY

Panchanon Kumar Dhali, Jurgen Pretzsch, Klaus Romisch, Abdus Subhan Mollick

Abstract
Forest resources in Bangladesh have been continuously depleting in terms of both area and quality. Traditional forest management practices have failed to improve the situation. As a result, Participatory Forest Management (PFM) has been proved as a successful strategy to solve the problem. Most of the studies on PFM in Bangladesh have tried to measure the physical targets of participatory forestry. However, the nature and extent of people’s participation in participatory forest management have been rarely investigated. This study examined the level and extent of people’s participation in participatory forest management in the Sal forest of Bangladesh. In this study, six PFM groups (three most benefited and three least benefited groups) were selected from the study area. Both qualitative and quantitative methods particularly questionnaire survey, key informant interview, group discussion and observation were employed to collect the data. Analysis of data revealed that PFM activities in the study area were very much centralized. Planning and decision-making activities were almost fully centralized, whereas implementation activities were to some extent decentralized to PFM groups. PFM participants in the study area have considerable involvement in implementation and benefit sharing of PFM activities. PFM participants involve themselves in activities like planting, tending, thinning and protection of plantations and in sharing benefits obtained from the felling of such plantations. However, PFM participants have little or no involvement in the planning and decision making of PFM activities. This study provides the basis for understanding of local people’s involvement in PFM activities in Bangladesh.

Keywords: forests, forest management, participation, Bangladesh.



International Journal of Social Forestry (IJSF), 2012, 5(1): 57-83

LOCAL KNOWLEDGE AND TREE SPECIES PREFERENCE FOR LAND REHABILITATION IN KENYA

Edinam K. Glover

Abstract
Kenya’s natural resources are under considerable threat and are already severely degraded in many areas due to overgrazing, clearance of forests and woodlands cover for agriculture, as well as fuelwood collection. According to available records, about 75% of the landmass in Kenya is dryland, exposed to the vicissitudes of an irregular rainfall pattern. This study identifies local people’s priority tree species most apt to halt land degradation in Karai Location. Data was gathered through questionnaire-based interviews with households. Descriptive statistics suggest farmers' preferences for tree species and the reasons behind their preferences. Results also show the great potential and challenge of agroforestry in the area. Farmers in Karai are interested in cultivating exotic species, namely, Grevillea robusta, Eucalyp¬tus saligna, Casuarina equisi¬tifolia, Leucaena leucocep¬hala, Calliandra calothyrsus and Sesbania sesban on their farms. This study concludes that the agrofores¬try approach of incorporating "scientifically approved" multipurpose trees of farmers' own preference into the exis-ting landuse systems would simultaneously restore the environment, conserve the forests, generate income for resource-poor farmers, catalyse more sus¬tainable land-use practices and enhance increased and sustained food production.

Keywords: agroforestry, climate change, land degradation, overgrazing, preferred tree species, Kenya



International Journal of Social Forestry (IJSF), 2012, 5(1): 84-98

THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF FOREST HYDROLOGICAL SERVICES: A CASE STUDY AT BUKIT SULIGI PROTECTED FOREST, THE UPPER PART OF SIAK WATERSHED, RIAU

Mamat Rahmat, Sofyan P. Warsito, Wahyu Andayani, Dwidjono H. Darwanto, and Takahiro Fujiwara

Abstract
Bukit Suligi Protected Forest (BSPF), situated in the headstream area of many rivers in Riau Province, plays an important role in providing hydrological services such as flood prevention in the rainy season and water supply in the dry season. Siak River is one of the rivers which runs from BSPF. The objectives of this study are to clarify the recent condition of BSPF and to estimate the economic value of BSPF’s hydrological services. Contingent valuation method was employed to elicit people’s willingness to pay (WTP) for the hydrological services. Interviews were carried out in Dayo Village, which is located in the upper part of Siak Watershed and adjacent to BSPF. The sampling rate of respondents was 8% of the total households in Dayo Village. The findings showed that an average WTP value of the respondents was 113,000 IDR per household per year. This value indicated the indirect benefit which people obtained from hydrological services of the BSPF area. Moreover, based on the calculation result of these values to the total amount of the household and forest area, the economic value of hydrological services of BSPF was 73,096 IDR per hectare per year.

Key words: Environmental Services; Protected Forest, Willingness to Pay, Contingent Valuation

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